Passive smoking affects cognitive fetal development

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Passive smoking affects cognitive fetal development

Pregnant women who do not smoke, but that are exposed to environments with smoke, not only suffer from the effects of passive, if not smoking that this also affects the fetus. This has recently demonstrated researchers from the Group NUTRISAM-nutrition and Mental health of the departments of psychology and medical basic sciences of Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), in Tarragona.

Babies of mothers who smoke or passive smoking, presented during the first 48 hours of life greater muscular tension, irritability or excitement

Specifically, the study concluded that passive smoking affects the cognitive development of infants in a manner similar to what active smoking would do it. It has been that, although the future mother don’t smoke, if it is in a setting with smoke, nicotine can also pass into the bloodstream of pregnant women, cross the placenta and therefore affect the central nervous system of the fetus.

The research analyzed 158 women and their children during different stages. During pregnancy, pregnant underwent quarterly questionnaires where they were asked about their smoking habit (both active and passive) or other drugs. The birth of every baby, the specialists observed their behavior during the first 48 hours of life and finally, tracked the cognitive development of children at 6 months of life, the year, and at 30 months.

The results left no one indifferent. It was that those newborn babies of mothers who smoke or passive smoking presented during the first two days of life greater muscular tension, irritability or excitement that babies of mothers who don’t smoke or who had left the tobacco at the beginning of the pregnancy. A few symptoms that, according to the specialists, could be cause of having the most immature central nervous system.

Also, at 6, 12 and 30 months of life smoking or passive smoking and tobacco-free mothers babies were also cognitive differences among children of mothers. Specifically, children of mothers (as they were active or passive smokers) tobacco-related presented a worse language development. At 6 months and one year of life them was more difficult to repeat sounds or tell the first words, and at age two and half (30 months) showed greater difficulty in expressive and receptive language.

In addition to demonstrating that passive tobacco also affects the development of the fetus, this study has also shown the benefits that has quit smoking at the beginning of the pregnancy. And is that the research was that babies whose mothers left the tobacco during the first trimester of pregnancy, presented psychosocial abilities and cognitive similar to children of breast non-smokers or that they had quit smoking before becoming pregnant.

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